Name Phone Email Institution
Elise Bant +61 3 834 41085 e.bant@unimelb.edu.au Melb Uni
Kit Barker +61 7 334 67609 k.barker@law.uq.edu.au UQ
Katy Barnett   k.barnett2@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au Melb Uni
Matthew Bell +61 3 834 48921  m.bell@unimelb.edu.au Melb Uni
Michael Bryan +61 3 834 46204 m.bryan@unimelb.edu.au Melb Uni
John Devereux +61 7 336 52298 j.devereux@law.uq.edu.au UQ
Arlen Duke +61 3 834 41081 a.duke@unimelb.edu.au Melb Uni
Nick Gaskell +61 7 336 52490 d.gaskell@law.uq.edu.au UQ
Andrew Godwin +61 3 834 41030 a.godwin@unimelb.edu.au Melb Uni
Ross Grantham +61 7 334 69776 r.grantham@law.uq.edu.au UQ
Matthew Harding +61 3 834 41080 m.harding@unimelb.edu.au Melb Uni
Russell Hinchy +61 7 336 52357 r.hinchy@law.uq.edu.au UQ
Darryn Jensen +61 7 336 52218 d.jensen@law.uq.edu.au UQ
Andrew Kenyon +61 3 834 49972 a.kenyon@unimelb.edu.au Melb Uni
Qiao Liu +61 7 336 57174 q.liu@law.uq.edu.au UQ
Harold Luntz +61 3 834 46187 h.luntz@unimelb.edu.au Melb Uni
Ian Malkin +61 3 834 46594 i.malkin@unimelb.edu.au Melb Uni
Peter McDermott +61 7 336 57173 p.mcdermott@law.uq.edu.au UQ
Andrew Robertson +61 3 834 40379 a.robertson@unimelb.edu.au Melb Uni
Michelle Sharpe +61 3 834 44770 m.sharpe@unimelb.edu.au Melb Uni
Loane Skene +61 3 834 44858 l.skene@unimelb.edu.au Melb Uni
David Studdert +61 3 834 41237 d.studdert@unimelb.edu.au Melb Uni
Christian Witting +61 3 834 48915 c.witting@unimelb.edu.au Melb Uni

 

Elise Bant is an Associate Professor at the Melbourne Law School. Her areas of expertise are unjust enrichment and restitution law, equity, trusts, property, contract and tort. Elise recently completed a doctoral thesis in the University of Oxford titled The Change of Position Defence, which is to be published in 2008/2009 by Hart Publishing. Elise is also the co-author of the textbook Unjust Enrichment in Australia (Oxford University Press, 2006) and has published in the University of Western Australia Law Review, Journal of Banking and Finance Law and Practice and many other professional journals. She is currently working on a project considering causation issues and their implications for the law of unjust enrichment.

Kit Barker is an Associate Professor in the TC Beirne School of Law. He is also admitted as a barrister of the Middle Temple, London. His areas of expertise are contract, tort and restitution. Kit is co-author of Unjust Enrichment (Butterworths, 2008) and the regional editor of the Restitution Law Review. He has published multiple book chapters and has published in the Cambridge Law Journal, Journal of Contract Law, Law Quarterly Review, Medical Law Review, Modern Law Review, Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, Restitution Law Review, University of Queensland Law Journal and Lloyds Maritime and Commercial Law Quarterly. He has received a number of grants to research unjust enrichment and contract law.

Matthew Bell is a lecturer in the Melbourne Law School. His area of expertise is construction contracts. Matthew recently co-authored (with I Bailey) the text Understanding Australian Construction Contracts (Thompson Reuters, 2008) and he is an editor of Construction Law International. Matthew is Professional Support Lawyer to the national Construction and Major Projects Group at Clayton Utz on a part-time basis.

Michael Bryan is a Professor in the Melbourne Law School. He formerly taught at Oriel College, Oxford, and Queen Mary College, London. Michael’s areas of expertise are equity, trusts and restitution. Michael is co-author of The Law of Non-Disclosure (Longmans 1995), an editor of Ford and Lee, The Law of Trusts (Thomson 2003) and the editor of Private Law in Theory and Practice (Routledge, 2007). He has published in the Alberta Law review, Australian Business Law Review, King’s College Law Journal, Lloyd’s Maritime and Commercial Law Quarterly, Melbourne University Law Review, Restitution Law Review, Sydney Law Review, and the University of Queensland Law Review. He recently completed a research project entitled ‘Recipient Liability under the Torrens System: Some Category Errors’.

John Devereux is a Professor at the TC Beirne School of Law. He has been admitted as a barrister and solicitor in Queensland and as a barrister in Tasmania. He has served as a Law Reform Commissioner for Queensland and is a legal member of the Commonwealth Social Security Appeals Tribunal. He was a member of both the Australian Institute of Health Law and Ethics and the Association Internationale de Droit et de Sante Mentale. He specialises in tort and medical law. John has authored Australian Medical Law (Routledge-Cavendish, 2007) and co-authored Torts: A Practical Learning Approach (Butterworths, 2008). He has published many paper including those in the Griffith Law Review, Journal of Law and Medicine, Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, Oxford University Commonwealth Law Journal, Singapore Journal of Legal Studies, Torts Law Review, and University of Queensland Law Review.

Arlen Duke is a lecturer in the Melbourne Law School. He is admitted as a barrister and solicitor in the Supreme Court of Victoria. His areas of expertise are the regulation of anti-competitive practices, consumer protection, obligations, law and economics and contract. Arlen is the co-author of Contract: Cases and Materials (Lawbook Co, forthcoming 2009) and has published in the Australian Business Law Review, Consumer and Competition Law Journal, Entertainment Law Review and Monash University Law Review. He is currently working on two papers: one examining the difficulties associated with proving the existence of anti-competitive agreements between competitors and another exploring the appropriate basis on which to impose liability on recipients of misappropriated trust assets.

Nick Gaskell is Professor of Maritime and Commercial law at the University of Queensland. He spent over 30 years at the School of Law of the University of Southampton, UK, during which he was Head of School, and Director of its Institute of Maritime Law. He has written books and articles on a wide range of maritime and related commercial law subjects. These include applied contract law (e.g. the carriage of goods by sea), applied tort law (relating to maritime casualties, e.g. collisions) and the extent to which international maritime law conventions provide private law remedies (e.g. for passengers, and in respect of marine pollution, wreck, salvage). His book Bills of Lading: Law and Contracts has been widely cited in courts in Australia and internationally.

Andrew Godwin is a senior lecturer in the Melbourne Law School. He is admitted as barrister and solicitor of the Supreme Court of Victoria and as a solicitor in the Supreme Court of England and Wales. He was formerly Chief Representative and Partner of the law firm Linklaters in Shanghai and retains a consultancy with that firm. Andrew is Associate Director (Asian Commercial Law) of the Asian Law Centre at the Melbourne Law School. His areas of expertise are Asian Law, insolvency law, professional training, banking and finance law, Chinese law and property. Andrew has published in the Australian Journal of Asian Law and University of New South Wales Law Journal. Andrew’s current research interests are Asian law, property law, finance transactions, insolvency law and professional training.

Ross Grantham is a Professor of Commercial Law, Head of School and Dean of Law at the TC Beirne School of Law. He is admitted as a solicitor and barrister of the High Court of New Zealand. His main areas of expertise are restitution and commercial law. Ross is a member of the editorial board of The Company Lawyerand the Journal of Corporate Law Studies and is the Australian editor of Journal of Business Law. He has published extensively, most recently co-authoring Structure and Justification in Private Law: Essays for Peter Birks (Hart Publishing, 2008) and Unjust Enrichment (LexisNexis, 2008). His journal articles have appeared in the Australian Bar Review, Company, Financial and Insolvency Law Review, Company Lawyer, Journal of Business Law, King’s College Law Journal, Law Quarterly Review, Lloyds Maritime and Commercial Law Quarterly, New Zealand Law Journal, New Zealand Universities Law Review, and Oxford Journal of Legal Studies.

Matthew Harding is a senior lecturer in the Melbourne Law School. He is a member of Balliol College, Oxford, the Oxford University Society of Victoria, the St James Ethics Centre, the Socio-Legal Studies Association and the Society of Legal Scholars. His major areas of expertise are trusts, fiduciary law, equitable property, land title registration, and the law of charity. Matthew has published in the Journal of Equity, Melbourne University Law Journal, Modern Law Review and University of New South Wales Law Journal. He is currently researching comparative land title registration systems through a grant provided by the University of Melbourne.

Russell Hinchy is a lecturer in the TC Beirne School of Law. He is admitted as a barrister in the High Court of Australia and in the Supreme Court of Queensland. His areas of expertise are company law, tort and legal method. Russel is the co-author of Company Law (Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006) and co-editor of Fundamental Company Legislation 2008 (Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008). He is also the author of The Australian Legal System: History, Institutions and Method (Pearson Longman, 2008). He has published in the Murdoch University E-Law Journal, New Zealand Law Journal, and Torts Law Journal, among others.

Darryn Jensen is a senior lecturer in the TC Beirne School of Law. He is admitted as a solicitor in the High Court of Australia and in the Supreme Court of Queensland. His areas of expertise are equity and trusts, property, legal and political philosophy. Darryn has published in the Adelaide Law Review, Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy, Australian Religion Studies Review, Journal of Equity, Singapore Journal of Legal Studies, and University of Queensland Law Journal.

Andrew Kenyon is a Professor in the Melbourne Law School. He is the editor of Media & Arts Law Review, a former president of the Law and Society Association of Australia and New Zealand, a member of the International Communications Association, the Law and Literature Association of Australia, the Socio-Legal Studies Association (UK). He is the Director of the Melbourne Law School’s Centre for Media and Communications Law and admitted to practise law in Victoria. Andrew is a specialist in comparative media and communications law, including defamation, privacy, copyright, journalism and media policy. He is the author of Defamation: Comparative Law and Practice (UCL Press, 2006) and co-authored The Right to Speak Ill: Defamation, Reputation and Free Speech (Carolina Academic Press, 2006). He has edited New Dimensions in Privacy Law: International and Comparative Perspectives, (Cambridge University Press, 2006) and TV Futures: Digital Television Policy in Australia (Melbourne University Press, 2007). He has published in numerous journals, including the Adelaide Law Review, Melbourne University Law Review, Monash University Law Review, Sydney Law Review and the University of New South Wales Law Journal.

Qiao Liu is a lecturer in the TC Beirne School of Law. He has been a member of the UK Society of Legal Scholars since 2005. His areas of expertise are contract, Chinese law and comparisons between Chinese and Anglo-Australian private law. He has published in the Cambridge Law Journal, Canadian Business Law Journal, International Business Lawyer, LawAsia Journal, Legal Studies, and Lloyd's Maritime and Commercial Law Quarterly.

Harold Luntz is a Professorial Fellow at the Melbourne Law School. Until 2002, he held the George Paton Chair of Law. He has been the secretary of the Victorian Chief Justice's Law Reform Committee, a part-time senior member of the Workcare Appeals Board in Victoria and Deputy Chair of the Seafarers Rehabilitation and Compensation Authority. He is the General Editor of the Torts Law Journal. His speciality is torts and damages compensation.

Harold is the author of Assessment of Damages for Personal Injury and Death (Butterworths, 2002), Assessment of Damages for Personal Injury and Death: General Principles (Butterworths, 2006) and Torts: Cases and Commentary (Butterworths, 2002). He has published widely in a multitude of legal journals.

Peter McDermott is an Associate Professor in the TC Beirne School of Law. He is admitted as a barrister in the Supreme Court of Queensland. His areas of expertise are equity and trusts, corporate law and the application of equitable doctrines to commercial situations. Peter has recently co-authored Company Law (Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008) and co-edited Fundamental Company Legislation 2008 (Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008). He has published widely in journals such as the Australian Law Journal, Cambridge Law Journal, Law Quarterly Review, and University of New South Wales Law Journal.

Ian Malkin is a Professor in the Melbourne Law School. His areas of expertise are torts, product liability, health and medical law and prisoners’ rights. Ian is co-author of Torts (Butterworths, 2008) and has published in the Melbourne University Law Review, Torts Law Journal and Journal of Drug Issues. Ian’s current research interests are, among many others, legal issues relevant to HIV/AIDS, harm minimisation and the provision of supervised injecting facilities, tort law and its potential role in preventing harm to marginalised in piduals, the regulation of Hepatitis C, and legal education.

Andrew Robertson is a Professor in the Melbourne Law School. He is admitted in the Supreme Court of Queensland, in the Courts of England and Wales and in the High Court of Australia. His areas of expertise are private law, contract and remedies. Andrew is the co-author of Principles of Contract Law (Law Book Co, forthcoming 2009) and Contract: Cases and Materials (Law Book Co, 2005) and editor of The Law of Obligations: Connections and Boundaries (UCL Press, 2004). He has published extensively in journals such as the Conveyancer and Property Lawyer, Journal of Contract Law, Legal Studies, Melbourne University Law Review, Monash University Law Review, Sydney Law Review and University of New South Wales Law Journal. In 2009, he will begin researching ‘Policy-Based Reasoning in Private Law’ through an ARC Discovery Grant.

Michelle Sharpe is a lecturer in the Melbourne Law School. She is also a barrister of the Supreme Court of Victoria, specialising in contract and trade practices law. She was elected a member of the Victorian Bar Council and Assistant Convener of the Women Barristers Association in 2007. She teaches contract, civil procedure, dispute resolution and legal ethics at the Melbourne Law School. Michelle co-authored a research paper ‘Assessment of the Impact of ACCC Regulatory Enforcement Action in Unconscionable Conduct Cases’ that was published in the Trade Practices Law Journal in 2007. She completed a PhD at the Melbourne Law School entitled ‘Freedom and Fairness: a Republican Theory of Contract Law’.

Loane Skene is Professor of Law in the Melbourne Law School and an Adjunct Professor of Law in the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences. She is Deputy Director of the Centre for Law and Genetics at the University of Tasmania and the University of Melbourne; Program Director, Medical Ethics, Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics (CAPPE), Charles Sturt University and The University of Melbourne, and Board member, Australian and New Zealand Institute of Health, Law and Ethics (ANZIHLE), formerly the Australian Institute of Health ,Law and Ethics (AIHLE). She has served on many federal and state policy committees, especially in relation to the legal regulation of genetic testing. Loane is the author of Law and Medical Practice: Rights, Duties, Claims and Defences, (1st ed, Butterworths, 1998; 2nd ed, Lexis-Nexis, 2004) and You, Your Doctor and the Law (OUP, 1990). She has also published numerous chapters in book and articles in Australian and overseas legal, medical and scientific journals. Her research interests also include the legal regulation of genetic testing, assisted reproductive technology and euthanasia.

David Studdert is a Federation Fellow and holds a joint professorial appointment in the Melbourne Law School and the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences. He is Deputy Head of the Melbourne School of Population Health and Chair of the Health Ethics Advisory Committee to the Melbourne School of Population Health. His areas of expertise are damages and compensation, health law and bioethics, law and society, medical law and torts. David has published over 120 articles and book chapters. His works have appeared in many leading international medical, health policy, and law journals, including the American Journal of Law and Medicine, Harvard Journal on Legislation, Georgetown Law Journal, Indiana Law Review, Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, Journal of Legal Studies and New England Journal of Medicine.

Christian Witting is an Associate Professor in the Melbourne Law School, Member of the Centre for Corporate Law and Securities Regulation, and Fellow of the European Centre for Tort and Insurance Law, Vienna. He is admitted as a barrister and solicitor in the High Court of Australia and the Supreme Court of Victoria. His areas of expertise are corporations and tort law. Christian is the author of Liability for Negligent Misstatements (Oxford, 2004) and co-editor of Pure Economic Loss (Springer Verlag, 2004). He has published in the Cambridge Law Journal, Law Quarterly Review, Legal Studies, Melbourne University Law Review, Modern Law Review, Monash University Law Review, Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, University of New South Wales Law Journal and a number of professional journals. Christian’s current research examines limited liability and the liability of corporate groups and is funded by the Australian Research Council.